Legislative Developments

Last week, the DOL unveiled its new regulations aiming to increase the annual salary threshold to $35,000 for “white collar” overtime exemptions, up from the current $23,660 set in 2004.  The DOL estimates that this will result in approximately 1.3 million additional workers now qualifying for overtime.  The DOL also increased the “highly compensated worker”

Recently, the Legislature passed and the Governor signed two Public Acts that made significant changes to the statutes addressing sexual harassment in the workplace.  These bills are collectively known as the Time’s Up Act.  Among the significant changes made by the Act were changes that (1) expanded the training requirement from employers with 50 employees

Join us for our annual fall seminar on October 11, 2019 at the Hartford Marriott Downtown. This promises to be an interesting and informative program regarding recent developments in labor and employment law. Our half-day seminar will include discussions of the timely topics listed below as well as updates on recent legislation and court decisions

On July 10, Henry J. Zaccardi and Ashley L. Marshall presented a complimentary webinar summarizing new laws passed in the 2019 legislative session of the Connecticut General Assembly. Among the topics discussed were changes to sexual harassment prevention training requirements, paid family medical leave, CT’s minimum wage, and new whistleblower protections. Many employers across the

Connecticut’s legislature passed Public Act 19-25 to amend the state’s Family and Medical Leave Act, which the Governor has signed into law. Much attention has gone to PA 19-25’s creation of paid FML leave, although it will take some time to get that up and running (employee contributions start 01/01/2021, with paid benefit availability starting

While new laws regarding Paid FMLA and Sexual Harassment Training have been receiving the majority of the press on the most recent legislative term at the General Assembly, one bill that passed in the waning hours will have a significant impact for restaurants in Connecticut.

House Bill 5001, which awaits the Governor’s signature at

In its 2019 session, the General Assembly passed a number of new laws affecting employers. Except as otherwise noted, the changes are effective October 1, 2019. The following material summarizes these new laws, but the specific provisions should be reviewed in the context of specific situations. These new statutes are available online through the General

In its 2019 session, the Connecticut General Assembly passed a number of new laws affecting employers, many of which will become effective October 1, 2019. To assist employers in navigating the legislative changes, we invite you to join labor and employment law attorneys Henry Zaccardi and Ashley Marshall for this complimentary CLE webinar summarizing

Over the last week, the General Assembly passed two bills (Senate Bill 3 and 1111) that, when taken together, provide a series of reforms that will impact every Connecticut employer in one way or another. These bills are expected to be signed by Governor Lamont shortly and thus, these requirements will likely go into effect

On May 28, 2019, the New York City Council held a public hearing regarding proposed amendments to New York City’s Earned Safe and Sick Time Act (“ESSTA”) which would require employers to provide eligible employees with “personal time.” The bill also would provide more protections for employees, including protections against retaliation and the addition of monetary penalties for employer violations.
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