The growing season in Connecticut isn’t long but July is the prime time for fresh vegetables and fruits. There are plenty of “Farm to Table” events to attend, too.

Indeed, Connecticut has a proud history of farms. Many have been passed down for many generations. And don’t even get us started on Farmers Markets!

But…

Sometimes things that should be simple just have to be complicated! This is true for Family and Medical Leave Act matters when a seemingly straightforward situation throws a curveball because an employee tells you she “does not want FMLA leave… I want to save my time for another occasion….” Believe it or not, this can…

The Department of Labor this week rescinded a proposed rule that would have forced employers to disclose outside consultants they hire to counter workers’ union organizing efforts.

These consultants often work with lawyers for the company and the new rule would have, arguably, created some potential issues with the attorney client privilege for these companies.…

At the same time the Legislature made medicinal marijuana legal in Connecticut, it also passed a statute that addressed the use of medicinal marijuana by employees.  That statute, § 21a-408p, provides that:

  • No employer may refuse to hire or may discharge, penalize, or threaten an employee solely on the basis of their palliative use

In its 2018 session, the General Assembly passed a number of new laws affecting employers. Except as otherwise noted, the changes are effective October 1, 2018. The following material summarizes these new laws, but the specific provisions should be reviewed in the context of specific situations. These new statutes are available online through the…

On June 27, we issued an alert concerning the decision of the United States Supreme Court in Janus v. AFSCME (June 27, 2018). There, the Court held that mandatory agency fees (also sometimes known as service fees) for public employees violate the First Amendment rights of the affected employees. We wish now to follow up…

In a 5-4 decision, the United States Supreme Court today ruled that provisions requiring public employees to pay agency fees violate the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. In doing so, the Supreme Court expressly overruled its own 41-year-old precedent.

This closely watched case arose from a challenge by an Illinois public employee to the…

In its latest enforcement move to address workplace harassment, the EEOC has filed seven different lawsuits since June 11 seeking damages and an end to alleged harassment across a broad spectrum of settings.  The lawsuits are spread across many different industries–from one of the nation’s largest trucking companies, to a staffing agency, and even a…