On May 21, 2018, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a decision that upheld an arbitration clause requiring employees to arbitrate their claims in lieu of participating in a class action. In issuing its decision, the Supreme Court actually resolved three separate cases, all of which involved employees signing agreements to arbitrate individual employment claims. The…

Earlier this week I came across an article that was written by Aebra Coe and published in Employment Law360, entitled “Female In-House Attys Earn 84 Cents For Every Dollar Men Do.” This article is yet another reminder that regardless of occupation, women consistently have earned less pay for the same work. Despite the passage of…

Most times on this blog, we report on developments in courts or in the legislature.

But today’s post focuses on something that didn’t happen — namely a bill that didn’t pass — even though it looked almost certain earlier this week.

Indeed, Senate Bill 132 looked to have momentum.

In this political and legal…

Over the weekend, the General Assembly approved a bill prohibiting employers, including the state and its political subdivisions, from asking, or directing a third-party to ask, about a prospective employee’s wage and salary history.

The measure now moves to the Governor’s office for his signature.

The prohibition does not apply in two situations:

  • if the

On April 25, 2018, a Connecticut state court judge issued a decision giving a more expansive definition to the term “discipline” as it is used in Connecticut General Statutes § 31-51q (“Section 31-51q”). In doing so, the Court departed from the majority of previous state court decisions addressing this issue.

Section 31-51q prohibits an employer…

Join Shipman & Goodwin Immigration attorneys Brenda Eckert and Ashley Mendoza for this complimentary CLE webinar addressing what you need to know about recent changes in the interpretation, application and enforcement of immigration laws and regulations as they impact the employment of foreign nationals by all U.S. employers, including those in the healthcare, software and…

On Friday, April 27, 2018, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) announced that as of April 30th it will begin phasing in use of the U.S. Postal Service’s (“USPS”) Signature Confirmation Restricted Delivery Service for certain benefit-conferring immigration documents. The affected documents include permanent resident cards (e.g. “green cards”), employment authorization cards (“EAD”) and…

In speaking to job applicants, interviewers need to be circumspect in what they say. There are questions that can be asked, and there are questions that can create real headaches, as well as liability. A recent case demonstrates how comments in an interview ended up in federal court litigation.

A University hired a woman to…

United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) announced on April 11 that the agency had randomly selected enough H-1B petitions to meet the congressionally mandated cap and the U.S. advanced degree exemption, known as the master’s cap, for FY2019.  USCIS received 190,098 H-1B petitions during the filing period which began April 2, including petitions filed…

On occasion, many businesses provide unpaid internship opportunities. However, it is important to be sure the unpaid internship does not run afoul of the Fair Labor Standards Act, as some companies have learned the hard way that rather than having an unpaid intern they had an “employee” and ended up with wage and hour liability.…