As remote work continues to become more common, more employment law issues have arisen. In this informational session, we will spotlight some of the issues employers should consider in staffing a remote workforce.

WHEN: Thursday, October 21, 2021 | 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM EDT
WHERE: Webinar
REGISTER HERE

TOPICS:

  • Immigration Implications of remote working

As we have noted previously, the State’s new “wage range” notice law becomes effective October 1, 2021. In advance of that effective date, the Connecticut Department of Labor recently issued non-binding “guidance” on the law.

The new guidance tracks State law in many facets and thus much of it is fairly straightforward. However, a few

While many employers have been focused on pandemic-related issues this past year, there are important new Connecticut employment laws that become effective on October 1, 2021. Employers should review and, where necessary, update their existing policies and practices and train staff on these new laws.

For your convenience, we have summarized some of the laws

Connecticut has a host of new employment laws that take effect October 1, 2021. However, one new law will add a significant layer of complexity for employers, particularly in the hiring process.

Under Connecticut’s new law, employers are prohibited from failing or refusing to provide a job applicant with the “wage range” of the position

Over the last week, Governor Lamont signed two bills, House Bill 6380 (Public Act 21-30) and House Bill 5158 (Public Act 21-27), that will impact public and private employers beginning October 1, 2021 in significant (and yet entirely different) ways.

House Bill 6380 adds another layer of complexity for employers engaged in hiring and also

On December 27, 2020, after months of negotiations, Congress passed and the President signed The Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Applications Act, a 5,593-page appropriations bill which provides several forms of stimulus related to COVID-19. Many employers are wondering what effect the new law has on the paid leave provisions of the Families First Coronavirus

On April 24, 2020, the Paycheck Protection Program and Healthcare Enhancement Act (the “Enhancement Act”) was signed into law. The Enhancement Act increases the amount of funds appropriated under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the CARES Act) by providing an additional $310 billion for the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), $50 billion for

As most employers know by now, the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”) has two main components:  the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act (“EPSLA”) and the Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act (“EFMLEA” or “FMLA+”).  The United States Department of Labor (“USDOL”) has recently provided additional guidance on how an employer’s leave policies interact

If you didn’t know about Connecticut’s Shared Work Program before the pandemic, you weren’t the only one.  Over the last few years, only a small handful of employers statewide had even taken advantage of the program. Since the start of the pandemic, however, over 700 employers have applied for the program and over 500 of

On March 27, 2020, President Trump signed the “Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act.”  The CARES Act makes significant changes to the unemployment compensation structure for all employers, including governmental entities and non-profit organizations. The CARES Act also implements a Paycheck Protection Program, which is designed to provide a direct incentive for small businesses