On June 1, 2020 Governor Lamont issued Executive Order 7UU, which creates mandatory COVID-19 testing requirements for staff working at nursing homes and assisted living facilities, and modifies the definition of “suitable work” in the State’s unemployment regulations.  Employers should take notice of the potential expansion of the unemployment regulations under this Executive Order.

The

As we discussed in prior posts, the CARES Act made five significant changes to unemployment benefits in response to the COVID-19 pandemic:

  1. Creating Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) for individuals who were not previously eligible for unemployment benefits or who have exhausted all other forms of unemployment benefits;
  2. Providing individuals who exhausted regular unemployment compensation

On Tuesday, April 7, 2020, Governor Lamont issued his latest Executive Order (7V) mandating new workplace safety rules to be promulgated by the Department of Economic and Community Development (DECD) and the Department of Public Health (DPH).  Shortly thereafter, the new rules were released.  For essential businesses, these new rules should be implemented immediately. Also

The CARES Act made significant changes to unemployment benefits in response to the COVID pandemic.  As we explained in our March 31, 2020 update, this included expanding unemployment benefits to those who were not previously eligible (e.g. self-employed individuals or employees of religious schools), extending benefits for 13 additional weeks, and eliminating the one-week

On March 27, 2020, President Trump signed the “Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act.”  The CARES Act makes significant changes to the unemployment compensation structure for all employers, including governmental entities and non-profit organizations. The CARES Act also implements a Paycheck Protection Program, which is designed to provide a direct incentive for small businesses

Late Saturday, March 28, 2020, the United States Department of Labor updated, for the third time in less than a week, its guidance on the implementation of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”) paid leave provisions.

The most recent guidance, among other updates, addresses two issues that have previously been unclear and will have

As the COVID-19 situation continues to evolve, the White House recently announced that “out of an abundance of caution, temperature checks are now being performed on any individuals who are in close contact with the President and Vice President.”  These checks will cover employees, visitors, and members of the press.  In a prior post,

With Connecticut and other neighboring states now reporting COVID-19 cases, employers need to be prepared to act quickly as COVID-19 cases become more prevalent in the region.

As a preliminary matter, employers may consult the CDC, state DPH websites and their local health department for the most up-to-date information on how employers should respond to

On December 20, 2019, the President signed legislation repealing the excise tax, otherwise known as the “Cadillac tax,” on high cost health insurance plans.  Both houses of Congress had adopted the legislation the day before, as part of a federal spending package.

The excise tax was a component of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).  Without

United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) has published a final rule increasing the fee to use its Premium Processing Service from $1,410 to $1,440. The new fee will take effect on December 2, 2019, and requests for Premium Processing postmarked on or after this date must include the new fee.

USCIS offers Premium Processing