2019 ended with a bang for stakeholders of retirement plans with the passage of the SECURE Act, a major piece of federal legislation that will alter the retirement plan landscape for years to come. Signed into law as part of a $1.4 trillion bipartisan spending bill on December 20, the SECURE Act (the full name

On December 20, 2019, President Trump signed into law H.R. 1865, the Further Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020 (now Pub. L. 116-94) (the “Appropriations Act”), which, among other things, contains the Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement (SECURE) Act (the “Act”). The Act is a significant piece of retirement legislation which seeks to expand access

On December 20, 2019, the President signed legislation repealing the excise tax, otherwise known as the “Cadillac tax,” on high cost health insurance plans.  Both houses of Congress had adopted the legislation the day before, as part of a federal spending package.

The excise tax was a component of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).  Without

United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) has published a final rule increasing the fee to use its Premium Processing Service from $1,410 to $1,440. The new fee will take effect on December 2, 2019, and requests for Premium Processing postmarked on or after this date must include the new fee.

USCIS offers Premium Processing

USCIS has announced that on January 2, 2020 it will dispose of its E-Verify records for cases that are more than 10 years old. Specifically, USCIS will be destroying its E-Verify records that were created on or before December 31, 2009. After January 2, 2020, employers will no longer be able to access USCIS’ E-Verify

One hotly debated aspect of the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”) has been the so-called “Cadillac Tax” on high-cost health benefits, currently slated to take effect in 2022.  The Cadillac Tax is a 40% excise tax on the amount of employer-sponsored health care coverage which exceeds $10,200 for individuals and $27,500 for families.  (Higher thresholds apply

Daniel Schwartz and Christopher Engler will present the webinar “When the CHRO and EEOC Come Calling – Strategies for Employers.”

This webinar is appropriate for all in-house counsel, executives, human resources personnel and other employees who may be involved in responding to a complaint of discrimination/harassment at the state or federal level.

Topics include:

  • How

ICE is now conducting worksite inspections for STEM OPT employers. ICE’s stated purpose for conducting these inspections, or “site-visits”, is to confirm that STEM OPT students are receiving work-based practical training that directly relates to their area of study. See our previous post. Since instituting its new “site-visit” enforcement measure, ICE has issued guidance

Last week, the DOL unveiled its new regulations aiming to increase the annual salary threshold to $35,000 for “white collar” overtime exemptions, up from the current $23,660 set in 2004.  The DOL estimates that this will result in approximately 1.3 million additional workers now qualifying for overtime.  The DOL also increased the “highly compensated worker”