Discrimination & Harassment

In its latest enforcement move to address workplace harassment, the EEOC has filed seven different lawsuits since June 11 seeking damages and an end to alleged harassment across a broad spectrum of settings.  The lawsuits are spread across many different industries–from one of the nation’s largest trucking companies, to a staffing agency, and even a…

Cell phones are everywhere, and now smart phones with their apps have more functions than many computers. One of those functions is the ability to record without anyone knowing that they are being recorded. In the workplace, such actions can cause concerns as managers and supervisors frequently feel that employees are recording their conversations and…

Earlier this week I came across an article that was written by Aebra Coe and published in Employment Law360, entitled “Female In-House Attys Earn 84 Cents For Every Dollar Men Do.” This article is yet another reminder that regardless of occupation, women consistently have earned less pay for the same work. Despite the passage of…

Most times on this blog, we report on developments in courts or in the legislature.

But today’s post focuses on something that didn’t happen — namely a bill that didn’t pass — even though it looked almost certain earlier this week.

Indeed, Senate Bill 132 looked to have momentum.

In this political and legal…

Over the weekend, the General Assembly approved a bill prohibiting employers, including the state and its political subdivisions, from asking, or directing a third-party to ask, about a prospective employee’s wage and salary history.

The measure now moves to the Governor’s office for his signature.

The prohibition does not apply in two situations:

  • if the

On April 25, 2018, a Connecticut state court judge issued a decision giving a more expansive definition to the term “discipline” as it is used in Connecticut General Statutes § 31-51q (“Section 31-51q”). In doing so, the Court departed from the majority of previous state court decisions addressing this issue.

Section 31-51q prohibits an employer…

In speaking to job applicants, interviewers need to be circumspect in what they say. There are questions that can be asked, and there are questions that can create real headaches, as well as liability. A recent case demonstrates how comments in an interview ended up in federal court litigation.

A University hired a woman to…

Join Shipman & Goodwin labor and employment attorneys for this complimentary CLE webinar providing a discussion of changing laws and legal concerns related to opioids and medical marijuana in the workplace. Presenters will review recent court decisions, the interaction between state law and accommodations under the ADA and potential conflicts with federal laws. They will…

If an employee is an at-will employee, he or she is not entitled to any explanation about the reason for the termination.  Nevertheless, when terminating an employee, most employers sensibly provide the employee with a reason for the termination. In any subsequent litigation, the employer will be required to explain the legitimate, non-discriminatory reasons for…

Working understaffed is never easy for managers or the rest of the work force. The concern about getting the work done creates pressures on everyone. When an employee seeks an accommodation under the ADA, many questions arise. A recent case demonstrated what can happen when not working with the requesting employee.

A utility company staff…