Presumably in response to some well-publicized reports of public employees fired for official misconduct and walking away with generous pension benefits, the Connecticut Legislature passed a decade ago a statute authorizing pension reduction or revocation in such circumstances. Although the law has been utilized in a few situations since then, two recent cases demonstrate that

Does the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (the “ADEA”) apply to all public employers regardless of how many employees they have, or does it only apply to public employers with at least 20 employees? This is the question that was argued at the Supreme Court on October 1, 2018 in Mount Lemmon Fire District v.

Please join us for our annual fall seminar on October 25, 2018 at the Hartford Marriott Downtown. This promises to be an interesting and informative program regarding recent developments in labor and employment law. Our half-day seminar will include discussions of the timely topics listed here as well as updates on recent legislation and court

Attention to detail makes a big difference when employers are required by law to do specific things.  The failure to meet all the requirements of a statute can result in litigation and potentially costly judgments.  One statute is particularly detailed and requires absolute attention to detail – the Fair Credit Reporting Act.  That law governs

Almost one year ago, the #MeToo Movement took us by storm when men and women across the country began speaking out about their experiences of sexual harassment and abuse. Countless lawsuits have been filed, hundreds of stories have been told, and multiple public figures have been brought down since the #MeToo Movement’s rise on social and public media. In the midst of all of the controversy, many state legislatures and state agencies have taken affirmative steps toward minimizing sexual harassment in the workplace.
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The New York City Commission on Human Rights (the “Commission”) issued a notice seeking comments on proposed rules that will define violations and outline the scope of protections against discrimination with respect to gender identity or expression under the New York City Human Rights Law (“NYCHRL”) on July 18, 2018.  The proposed rules address a

The growing season in Connecticut isn’t long but July is the prime time for fresh vegetables and fruits. There are plenty of “Farm to Table” events to attend, too.

Indeed, Connecticut has a proud history of farms. Many have been passed down for many generations. And don’t even get us started on Farmers Markets!

But

Sometimes things that should be simple just have to be complicated! This is true for Family and Medical Leave Act matters when a seemingly straightforward situation throws a curveball because an employee tells you she “does not want FMLA leave… I want to save my time for another occasion….” Believe it or not, this can

The Department of Labor this week rescinded a proposed rule that would have forced employers to disclose outside consultants they hire to counter workers’ union organizing efforts.

These consultants often work with lawyers for the company and the new rule would have, arguably, created some potential issues with the attorney client privilege for these companies.

At the same time the Legislature made medicinal marijuana legal in Connecticut, it also passed a statute that addressed the use of medicinal marijuana by employees.  That statute, § 21a-408p, provides that:

  • No employer may refuse to hire or may discharge, penalize, or threaten an employee solely on the basis of their palliative use