Human Resources (HR) Compliance

In recent years male students who were removed from school following a Title IX investigation have sued, claiming that the school’s investigation was unfair and biased against them as males. As we discussed in a recent post, these claims have seen some success in the courts. Similar arguments are now being made by employees

Join us for our annual fall seminar on October 11, 2019 at the Hartford Marriott Downtown. This promises to be an interesting and informative program regarding recent developments in labor and employment law. Our half-day seminar will include discussions of the timely topics listed below as well as updates on recent legislation and court decisions

On August 29, 2019, the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) held that misclassifying an employee as an independent contractor, on its own, does not violate the National Labor Relations Act (the “Act”).

In Velox Express, Inc. and Jeannie Edge, Velox misclassified its employees as independent contractors. When Ms. Edge coordinated group complainants about the

On August 27, 2019, USCIS announced that, until further notice, employers should continue using the current version of the Form I-9 for Employment Eligibility Verification, even after the form’s expiration date of August 31, 2019 has passed.

USCIS has further clarified that it will provide updated information about the new version of the Form I-9

Can an employer provide health care coverage for its employees by simply setting aside cash for them on a tax-favored basis (in an HRA – a health reimbursement arrangement), and otherwise get out of the complexities of sponsoring an ERISA health care coverage program? Until now, the answer to that question was “NO” because that

As of 2019, employers are receiving letters from the Social Security Administration entitled “Employer Correction Requests.” These letters, also known as “mismatch” letters, are sent when the names or social security numbers listed on an employer’s W-2 forms do not match the names and social security numbers that the Administration has on file. While these

On June 25, 2019, Governor Lamont signed into law “An Act Concerning Paid Family and Medical Leave,” (“PFMLA”) enacting what is reported to be the most generous family leave law in the country. The law provides employees with up to 12 weeks of paid leave (14 weeks for those incapacitated by pregnancy) in a 12-month

Connecticut’s legislature passed Public Act 19-25 to amend the state’s Family and Medical Leave Act, which the Governor has signed into law. Much attention has gone to PA 19-25’s creation of paid FML leave, although it will take some time to get that up and running (employee contributions start 01/01/2021, with paid benefit availability starting

Shipman & Goodwin attorneys Gabe Jiran and Peter Murphy will present the Lorman webinar “Mental Illness, Intellectual Disabilities and the ADA.”

Addressing disabilities in the workplace under the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) presents many challenges to employers, especially when dealing with a mental impairment. These challenges cause some employers to accept any condition that

Last Friday, the National Labor Relations Board (“the Board”) held that the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center did not violate the National Labor Relations Act (“the Act”) when it kicked union organizers out of its cafeteria who had been grabbing lunch and talking union business with a few workers.  In doing so, the Board overturned