Human Resources (HR) Compliance

As we discussed in prior posts, the CARES Act made five significant changes to unemployment benefits in response to the COVID-19 pandemic:

  1. Creating Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) for individuals who were not previously eligible for unemployment benefits or who have exhausted all other forms of unemployment benefits;
  2. Providing individuals who exhausted regular unemployment compensation

As most employers know by now, the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”) has two main components:  the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act (“EPSLA”) and the Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act (“EFMLEA” or “FMLA+”).  The United States Department of Labor (“USDOL”) has recently provided additional guidance on how an employer’s leave policies interact

On Tuesday, April 7, 2020, Governor Lamont issued his latest Executive Order (7V) mandating new workplace safety rules to be promulgated by the Department of Economic and Community Development (DECD) and the Department of Public Health (DPH).  Shortly thereafter, the new rules were released.  For essential businesses, these new rules should be implemented immediately. Also

The CARES Act made significant changes to unemployment benefits in response to the COVID pandemic.  As we explained in our March 31, 2020 update, this included expanding unemployment benefits to those who were not previously eligible (e.g. self-employed individuals or employees of religious schools), extending benefits for 13 additional weeks, and eliminating the one-week

The COVID-19 pandemic has made decision-making for employers feel urgent. Each headline of new cases and new restrictions screams “action”; however, perspective and thoughtfulness are qualities that will serve us all well as we navigate daily challenges.

Our firm is part of Interlaw, Ltd. — a group of law firms from around the world

On December 20, 2019, the President signed legislation repealing the excise tax, otherwise known as the “Cadillac tax,” on high cost health insurance plans.  Both houses of Congress had adopted the legislation the day before, as part of a federal spending package.

The excise tax was a component of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).  Without

United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) has published a final rule increasing the fee to use its Premium Processing Service from $1,410 to $1,440. The new fee will take effect on December 2, 2019, and requests for Premium Processing postmarked on or after this date must include the new fee.

USCIS offers Premium Processing

USCIS has announced that on January 2, 2020 it will dispose of its E-Verify records for cases that are more than 10 years old. Specifically, USCIS will be destroying its E-Verify records that were created on or before December 31, 2009. After January 2, 2020, employers will no longer be able to access USCIS’ E-Verify

One hotly debated aspect of the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”) has been the so-called “Cadillac Tax” on high-cost health benefits, currently slated to take effect in 2022.  The Cadillac Tax is a 40% excise tax on the amount of employer-sponsored health care coverage which exceeds $10,200 for individuals and $27,500 for families.  (Higher thresholds apply