About a month ago, in Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard College, the U.S. Supreme Court all but sounded the death knell for considering race or ethnicity as such in admissions to public educational institutions or those receiving federal funds. 

Since then, many scholars, pundits, and attorneys have debated the extent to which the Court’s

In Hartford Police Department v. Commission on Human Rights & Opportunities (HPD v. CHRO), the Connecticut Supreme Court upheld the agency’s post‑hearing finding that a police department had unlawfully terminated a probationary officer due to discriminatory animus displayed by, and imputed from, a supervisor other than the final decisionmaker.

In doing so, the


This morning, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously toppled decades-old precedent governing an employer’s treatment of religious accommodation requests. While the decision in Groff v. DeJoy has been overshadowed by Students for Fair Admissions, Inc. v. President and Fellows of Harvard College, which threw out Harvard and UNC’s affirmative action programs, Groff has broad-reaching impacts

Connecticut’s 2023 General Assembly concluded last week. But for the first time in many years, many of the major pieces of legislation in the labor and employment area did not pass. In fact, the legislative session will ultimately be thought of for the bills that died on the floor, rather than for the bills that passed.  

As the cannabis industry grows both locally and nationally, labor organizers have increasingly targeted the field for unionization. While Connecticut is one of the earlier states to legalize cannabis, Connecticut only recently joined the ranks of states with unionized cannabis workers. As a result, Connecticut-based cannabis companies arguably enjoy some benefit from having the opportunity

Last week, amid much anticipation, the EEOC released a new technical assistance document for employers, providing guidance on the use of artificial intelligence (AI), while ensuring compliance with Title VII. Entitled “Assessing Adverse Impact in Software, Algorithms, and Artificial Intelligence Used in Employment Selection Procedures Under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of

Businesses entering the provisional license stage in Connecticut’s nascent adult-use cannabis market are beginning to grapple with labor and employment issues.  In addition to hiring a workforce, prospective cannabis businesses must also consider the role of organized labor.  The Responsible and Equitable Regulation of Adult-Use Cannabis Act (the “Cannabis Act”) contains specific requirements for cannabis businesses pertaining

On February 21, 2023, the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) issued a new decision restricting the ability of private-sector employers to include non-disparagement and confidentiality provisions within severance agreements.  The decision, McLaren Macomb and Local 40 RN Staff Council, Office and Professional Employees, International Union (OPEIU), AFL–CIO, Case 07–CA–263041, reversed two Trump-era decisions that permitted

This week the United States Supreme Court held that highly compensated employees are not exempt from overtime requirements unless they are paid on a salary basis.  In other words, employers cannot avoid paying overtime to employees simply because they earn a high hourly or daily rate.  Rather, employers must provide employees with a reliable, predetermined compensation regardless