If you work in the Human Resources field you almost certainly understand the basic obligations employers must deal with under the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”). Most often the issue you face involves analysis of the essential functions of an employee’s job and consideration of reasonable accommodations to permit the employee to perform those functions.

Payroll is an important function for both employers and employees alike, and unfortunately, mistakes can happen during the payroll process.  When an employee is underpaid, they often are quick to bring it to the employer’s attention.  In our experience, though, when the mistake is in the employee’s favor, it often goes unfixed until the employer

A recent Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) memorandum may help employers in finding ways to reduce workplace injuries, workers’ compensation claims, and lost time due to injuries. As outlined in the memorandum, employers will be able to carefully develop and implement safety incentive programs that reward employees for not having any reportable injuries in

Presumably in response to some well-publicized reports of public employees fired for official misconduct and walking away with generous pension benefits, the Connecticut Legislature passed a decade ago a statute authorizing pension reduction or revocation in such circumstances. Although the law has been utilized in a few situations since then, two recent cases demonstrate that

Does the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (the “ADEA”) apply to all public employers regardless of how many employees they have, or does it only apply to public employers with at least 20 employees? This is the question that was argued at the Supreme Court on October 1, 2018 in Mount Lemmon Fire District v.

Please join us for our annual fall seminar on October 25, 2018 at the Hartford Marriott Downtown. This promises to be an interesting and informative program regarding recent developments in labor and employment law. Our half-day seminar will include discussions of the timely topics listed here as well as updates on recent legislation and court

Attention to detail makes a big difference when employers are required by law to do specific things.  The failure to meet all the requirements of a statute can result in litigation and potentially costly judgments.  One statute is particularly detailed and requires absolute attention to detail – the Fair Credit Reporting Act.  That law governs

Almost one year ago, the #MeToo Movement took us by storm when men and women across the country began speaking out about their experiences of sexual harassment and abuse. Countless lawsuits have been filed, hundreds of stories have been told, and multiple public figures have been brought down since the #MeToo Movement’s rise on social and public media. In the midst of all of the controversy, many state legislatures and state agencies have taken affirmative steps toward minimizing sexual harassment in the workplace.
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The New York City Commission on Human Rights (the “Commission”) issued a notice seeking comments on proposed rules that will define violations and outline the scope of protections against discrimination with respect to gender identity or expression under the New York City Human Rights Law (“NYCHRL”) on July 18, 2018.  The proposed rules address a

The growing season in Connecticut isn’t long but July is the prime time for fresh vegetables and fruits. There are plenty of “Farm to Table” events to attend, too.

Indeed, Connecticut has a proud history of farms. Many have been passed down for many generations. And don’t even get us started on Farmers Markets!

But